lonequixote:

Don Quixote and Sancho Pansa ~ Honore Daumier

lonequixote:

Don Quixote and Sancho Pansa ~ Honore Daumier

(via lonequixote)

This was posted 1 week ago. It has 338 notes. .
cartoonpolitics:

"In the United States today the Declaration of Independence hangs on schoolroom walls but foreign policy follows Machiavelli." ~ (Howard Zinn)

cartoonpolitics:

"In the United States today the Declaration of Independence hangs on schoolroom walls but foreign policy follows Machiavelli." ~ (Howard Zinn)

This was posted 1 week ago. It has 742 notes. .

nevver:

The song we once knew

This was posted 1 week ago. It has 4,112 notes.

youtube-documentaries:

Kingdom of the Little People - "In a land far, far away, love flourishes in a kingdom quite unlike any other. In mushroom-shaped homes and old dormitories, a community of dwarfs—all less than 51 inches tall—can be found singing, dancing, and performing on a daily basis for visiting tourists."

(via knowledgeequalsblackpower)

This was posted 1 week ago. It has 41 notes.
Finally, Some Comforting News for Single People

(Source: micdotcom)

This was posted 1 week ago. It has 73 notes.
neurosciencestuff:

Eating habits, body fat related to differences in brain chemistry
People who are obese may be more susceptible to environmental food cues than their lean counterparts due to differences in brain chemistry that make eating more habitual and less rewarding, according to a National Institutes of Health study published in Molecular Psychiatry.
Researchers at the NIH Clinical Center found that, when examining 43 men and women with varying amounts of body fat, obese participants tended to have greater dopamine activity in the habit-forming region of the brain than lean counterparts, and less activity in the region controlling reward. Those differences could potentially make the obese people more drawn to overeat in response to food triggers and simultaneously making food less rewarding to them. A chemical messenger in the brain, dopamine influences reward, motivation and habit formation.
"While we cannot say whether obesity is a cause or an effect of these patterns of dopamine activity, eating based on unconscious habits rather than conscious choices could make it harder to achieve and maintain a healthy weight, especially when appetizing food cues are practically everywhere," said Kevin D. Hall, Ph.D., lead author and a senior investigator at National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases (NIDDK), part of NIH. "This means that triggers such as the smell of popcorn at a movie theater or a commercial for a favorite food may have a stronger pull for an obese person – and a stronger reaction from their brain chemistry – than for a lean person exposed to the same trigger."
Study participants followed the same eating, sleeping and activity schedule. Tendency to overeat in response to triggers in the environment was determined from a detailed questionnaire. Positron emission tomography (PET) scans evaluated the sites in the brain where dopamine was able to act.
According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, more than one-third of U.S. adults are obese. Obesity-related conditions include heart disease, type 2 diabetes and certain types of cancer, some of the leading causes of preventable death.
"These findings point to the complexity of obesity and contribute to our understanding of how people with varying amounts of body fat process information about food," said NIDDK Director Griffin P. Rodgers, M.D. "Accounting for differences in brain activity and related behaviors has the potential to inform the design of effective weight-loss programs."
The study did not demonstrate cause and effect among habit formation, reward, dopamine activity, eating behavior and obesity. Future research will examine dopamine activity and eating behavior in people over time as they change their diets, physical activity, and their weight.

neurosciencestuff:

Eating habits, body fat related to differences in brain chemistry

People who are obese may be more susceptible to environmental food cues than their lean counterparts due to differences in brain chemistry that make eating more habitual and less rewarding, according to a National Institutes of Health study published in Molecular Psychiatry.

Researchers at the NIH Clinical Center found that, when examining 43 men and women with varying amounts of body fat, obese participants tended to have greater dopamine activity in the habit-forming region of the brain than lean counterparts, and less activity in the region controlling reward. Those differences could potentially make the obese people more drawn to overeat in response to food triggers and simultaneously making food less rewarding to them. A chemical messenger in the brain, dopamine influences reward, motivation and habit formation.

"While we cannot say whether obesity is a cause or an effect of these patterns of dopamine activity, eating based on unconscious habits rather than conscious choices could make it harder to achieve and maintain a healthy weight, especially when appetizing food cues are practically everywhere," said Kevin D. Hall, Ph.D., lead author and a senior investigator at National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases (NIDDK), part of NIH. "This means that triggers such as the smell of popcorn at a movie theater or a commercial for a favorite food may have a stronger pull for an obese person – and a stronger reaction from their brain chemistry – than for a lean person exposed to the same trigger."

Study participants followed the same eating, sleeping and activity schedule. Tendency to overeat in response to triggers in the environment was determined from a detailed questionnaire. Positron emission tomography (PET) scans evaluated the sites in the brain where dopamine was able to act.

According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, more than one-third of U.S. adults are obese. Obesity-related conditions include heart disease, type 2 diabetes and certain types of cancer, some of the leading causes of preventable death.

"These findings point to the complexity of obesity and contribute to our understanding of how people with varying amounts of body fat process information about food," said NIDDK Director Griffin P. Rodgers, M.D. "Accounting for differences in brain activity and related behaviors has the potential to inform the design of effective weight-loss programs."

The study did not demonstrate cause and effect among habit formation, reward, dopamine activity, eating behavior and obesity. Future research will examine dopamine activity and eating behavior in people over time as they change their diets, physical activity, and their weight.

This was posted 1 week ago. It has 146 notes. .
China's Island Factory

the-feature:

New islands are being made in the disputed South China Sea by the might of the Chinese state. But a group of marooned Filipinos on a rusting wreck is trying to stand in the way.

This was posted 1 week ago. It has 13 notes.

senfonikankara:

Szymanowski | Nocturne and Tarantella

This was posted 1 week ago. It has 19 notes.

engineeringhistory:

Morton Subotnick’s 1968 album “Silver Apples of the Moon”, the first electronic music recording commissioned by a classical record label.

This was posted 1 week ago. It has 48 notes.
One World Trade Center: How New York Tried To Rebuild Its Soul

the-feature:

When Ground Zero was finally cleared after the fall of the twin towers, New Yorkers trusted that thoughtful, ambitious urban design could make the city whole again. Why have they been so badly let down?

This was posted 1 week ago. It has 19 notes.
In the Wake: Interview with Lierre Keith

deepgreenresistance:

"I think the biggest reason otherwise radical people don’t want to face the necessity of ending industrial civilization is privilege. We’re the ones reaping the benefits. We’ve sold out the rest of life on earth for convenience, creature comforts, and cheap consumer goods, and it’s appalling. I’m sickened by this bargain. It’s immoral. It’s a true sacrilege.

And what’s been frustrating to me for twenty-five years is conversations with people who agree, who know the planet is dying, who’ve done civil disobedience, and who’ve wept over the destruction. When I say, “We’re going to have to learn to live without electricity, without cars,” they say, “But I like the convenience. I like having a car. I like air conditioning.” I don’t know what to do with these people. That was worth destroying the planet?

Their hesitation isn’t even about real survival needs like food. Nobody has once said to me, “But what will I eat?” It’s always really stupid shit like air conditioning.”
~ Lierre Keith, co-author of the book Deep Green Resistance

http://ift.tt/15Dit6r

http://ift.tt/1qu8EGS

(via lifting-of-the-veil)

This was posted 1 week ago. It has 6 notes.
Pundits and news celebrities on the airwaves engage in fevered speculation about whether the wife of a former president will run for office—and this after the mediocre son of another president spent eight years in the White House. This is not politics. It is gossip. Opinion polls, the staple of what serves as political reporting, are not politics. They are forms of social control. The use of billions of dollars to fund election campaigns and pay lobbyists to author legislation is not politics. It is legalized bribery. The insistence that austerity and economic rationality, rather than the welfare of the citizenry, be the primary concerns of the government is not politics. It is the death of civic virtue. The government’s system of wholesale surveillance and the militarization of police forces, along with the psychosis of permanent war and state-orchestrated fear of terrorism, are not politics. They are about eradicating civil liberties and justifying endless war and state violence. The chatter about death panels, abortion, gay rights, guns and undocumented children crossing the border is not politics. It is manipulation by the power elites of emotion, hate and fear to divert us from seeing our own powerlessness.
Chris Hedges (via azspot)

(via azspot)

This was posted 1 week ago. It has 64 notes.
russian-style:

Leonid Brahilovsky - The Blue Moscow, 1920th

russian-style:

Leonid Brahilovsky - The Blue Moscow, 1920th

(via theartgeeks)

This was posted 1 week ago. It has 7,872 notes. .
nativeamericannews:

History & Causes of the King William’s War
History & Causes of the King William’s War – Political Policies and Beliefs What were the causes of the King William’s War? Some of the history and causes of the Indian Wars were dictated by political policies and beliefs which shaped the historical background to the causes of the King William’s War

nativeamericannews:

History & Causes of the King William’s War

History & Causes of the King William’s War – Political Policies and Beliefs What were the causes of the King William’s War? Some of the history and causes of the Indian Wars were dictated by political policies and beliefs which shaped the historical background to the causes of the King William’s War



This was posted 1 week ago. It has 11 notes. .
nativeamericannews:

Specific Causes of the Tuscarora War
Specific Causes of the Tuscarora War What were the specific causes of the Tuscarora War? The specific causes of the Tuscarora War at a local level were:Some of the terms of the Treaty of Utrecht that ended the Queen Anne’s War were ambiguous, and concerns of various Indian tribes were not included in the treaty, which resulted in future conflicts in the French and Indian Wars and the Tuscarora War

nativeamericannews:

Specific Causes of the Tuscarora War

Specific Causes of the Tuscarora War What were the specific causes of the Tuscarora War? The specific causes of the Tuscarora War at a local level were:
Some of the terms of the Treaty of Utrecht that ended the Queen Anne’s War were ambiguous, and concerns of various Indian tribes were not included in the treaty, which resulted in future conflicts in the French and Indian Wars and the Tuscarora War


This was posted 1 week ago. It has 15 notes. .