I live my life in widening circles
That reach across the world.
I may not ever complete the last one,
But I give myself to it.

I circle around God, that ancient tower.
I have been circling for thousands of years,
And I still don’t know: am I a falcon,
A storm, or a great song?

 Rainer Maria Rilke

(via artemisdreaming)

(via artemisdreaming)

This was posted 1 week ago. It has 43 notes.
The advent of Big Data has resurrected the fantasy of a social physics, promising a new data-driven technique for ratifying social facts with sheer algorithmic processing power.

Nathan Jurgenson, View From Nowhere

(via stoweboyd)

(via emergentfutures)

This was posted 1 week ago. It has 64 notes.
Richard D. Wolff, "Socialism and Workers' Self-Directed Enterprises"

amodernmanifesto:

​Global capitalism has huge problems coping with the second worst collapse in its history. Its extreme and deepening inequalities have provoked millions to question and challenge capitalism. Yet socialists of all sorts now find it more difficult than ever to make effective criticisms and offer alternatives that inspire.

Part of the problem lies with classic socialism as it evolved over the last 150 years. Positions and strategies that once mobilized the victims and critics of capitalism are no longer, by themselves, effective. Not only has capitalism changed, but its celebrants also developed powerful critiques of socialist theory and especially of actually existing socialisms such as the Soviet Union (USSR). Socialism has not responded well to capitalism’s changes nor to its critiques; it has not made the necessary strategic and tactical shifts. Nonetheless, socialism retains the means to overcome its problems with some long-overdue self-criticism and innovation.

By classic socialism I mean the tradition that differentiated itself from capitalism chiefly in terms of macro-economic institutions. Classic socialists defined capitalism as (1) private ownership of means of production and (2) distribution of resources and products by means ofmarket exchanges. The socialist alternative entailed (1) socialized or public ownership of means of production (operated by the state as agent of the people as a whole) and (2) distribution of resources and products via state planning. Socialists attacked capitalism for the injustices, cyclical instability, and gross productive inefficiencies (e.g. unemployment, stagnation, etc.) that they traced to private enterprises and markets. In the socialists’ alternative, a workers’ state would control or own enterprises and plan the distribution of resources and products – in the democratically determined interests of the majority.

This was posted 1 week ago. It has 2 notes.

satanic-capitalist:

Concentration of Wealth in China Keeps Wages Low

Published on Oct 9, 2014

Rob Johnson says China needs to increase domestic demand, but the “Princelings” are getting rich in a low wage export led economy

This was posted 1 week ago. It has 4 notes.
liberalsarecool:

This is some sad shit. #FergusonOctober

liberalsarecool:

This is some sad shit. #FergusonOctober

This was posted 1 week ago. It has 192 notes. .
Should be a Gov Doc: Rethinking Columbus

gov-info:

via Teaching Peoples History: Zinn Education Project

Why rethink Christopher Columbus? Because the Columbus myth is a foundation of children’s beliefs about society. Columbus is often a child’s first lesson about encounters between different cultures and races. The murky legend of a brave adventurer tells children whose version of history to accept, and whose to ignore. It says nothing about the brutality of the European invasion of North America.

We need to listen to a wider range of voices. We need to hear from those whose lands and rights were taken away by those who “discovered” them. Their stories, too often suppressed, tell of 500 years of courageous struggle, and the lasting wisdom of native peoples. Understanding what really happened to them in 1492 is key to understanding why people suffer the same injustices today.

(register for free download)

This was posted 1 week ago. It has 20 notes.
1491

longform:

The Western Hemisphere before Columbus.

This was posted 1 week ago. It has 6 notes.

theantidote:

Tchaikovsky - Coffee (Arabian Dance)

(via teleskopet:)


This was posted 1 week ago. It has 79 notes. Played 735 times.
aseaofquotes:

Jean-Paul Sartre, No Exit

aseaofquotes:

Jean-Paul Sartre, No Exit

(via aseaofquotes)

This was posted 1 week ago. It has 6,413 notes. .
If a thoughtful question is not so simple and so salient that it determines the will and style of thinking for hundreds of years by assigning them the highest matter to be thought, then it is best that that question remain unasked. For if it is merely parroted, the question only adds wares to the nonstop bazaar offering a bewildering array of changing ‘problems’ and ‘reproaches’ that concern nothing and no one.
Martin Heidegger, Contributions to Philosophy (Of the Event), 18. (via modestproposals)

(via theoretical-and-philosophical)

This was posted 1 week ago. It has 23 notes.
shortformblog:

A long trip into the wilderness
tl;dr: This is ShortFormBlog’s last post. I’m going to play with another idea, tentatively called DataSlam, over this way.
On January 1, 2009, I started ShortFormBlog with the hope of building it into a pretty cool place for news, numbers, quotes, blurbs, and a few other things. It was a great thing to work on for a good long time, and it even had some success and a few people loved the dang thing.
But after a couple of abortive efforts to rekindle my personal interest in the site, I think now’s a good time to admit that it’s time to put it to rest. I’m getting older, and I have other things in my life that take precedence (you know, being married and stuff like that), and I admit that it would be nicer to experiment on a smaller scale, just to see what happens next and not force myself to do any one thing creatively.
So this is peace out. But I’ll always remember what became of SFB. You can build something yourself and watch it go somewhere. You can put your heart in things and see it grow. But it’s good to admit when the off switch should probably stay off.
Five sites you should read on Tumblr in SFB’s place:
BrooklynMutt: Peter Wade has been a great friend over the years and a man whose work I greatly respect. He’s always super-modest about his considerable skill. He has no reason to be.
Evan Fleischer: One of Tumblr’s most underrated minds.
PopCultureBrain: Why this guy isn’t writing for Entertainment Weekly, I’ll never know.
Mike Hedrick: A writer whose intelligence and clarity can knock you on your ass. He’s gotten a few bylines in the NYT.
Laughterkey: The best reblogger in the game.
Peace out folks. ShortFormBlog may be gone, but I’m not: I’m going to be playing with a new idea over this way. I’m calling it DataSlam (for now). Consider it my difficult, unformed second album. Old-school SFB will remain up in archive form.
It’s been good. — Ernie @ SFB

shortformblog:

A long trip into the wilderness

tl;dr: This is ShortFormBlog’s last post. I’m going to play with another idea, tentatively called DataSlam, over this way.

On January 1, 2009, I started ShortFormBlog with the hope of building it into a pretty cool place for news, numbers, quotes, blurbs, and a few other things. It was a great thing to work on for a good long time, and it even had some success and a few people loved the dang thing.

But after a couple of abortive efforts to rekindle my personal interest in the site, I think now’s a good time to admit that it’s time to put it to rest. I’m getting older, and I have other things in my life that take precedence (you know, being married and stuff like that), and I admit that it would be nicer to experiment on a smaller scale, just to see what happens next and not force myself to do any one thing creatively.

So this is peace out. But I’ll always remember what became of SFB. You can build something yourself and watch it go somewhere. You can put your heart in things and see it grow. But it’s good to admit when the off switch should probably stay off.

Five sites you should read on Tumblr in SFB’s place:

BrooklynMutt: Peter Wade has been a great friend over the years and a man whose work I greatly respect. He’s always super-modest about his considerable skill. He has no reason to be.

Evan Fleischer: One of Tumblr’s most underrated minds.

PopCultureBrain: Why this guy isn’t writing for Entertainment Weekly, I’ll never know.

Mike Hedrick: A writer whose intelligence and clarity can knock you on your ass. He’s gotten a few bylines in the NYT.

Laughterkey: The best reblogger in the game.

Peace out folks. ShortFormBlog may be gone, but I’m not: I’m going to be playing with a new idea over this way. I’m calling it DataSlam (for now). Consider it my difficult, unformed second album. Old-school SFB will remain up in archive form.

It’s been good. — Ernie @ SFB

This was posted 1 week ago. It has 282 notes. .
leprincelointain:

Thomas Cole (1801-1848), Sunny Morning on the Hudson River - 1827

leprincelointain:

Thomas Cole (1801-1848), Sunny Morning on the Hudson River - 1827

This was posted 1 week ago. It has 130 notes. .
Oldest recorded use of zero found in Cambodia

saintshiva:

In the 1930s a zero from the year AD 683 was found in Cambodia, and its great antiquity allowed a French researcher by the name of Georges Coedes to prove that the zero is of Eastern provenance. This is because, while the Gwalior zero is concurrent with the Arab empire based in Baghdad (the Caliphate), the zero from 683 predates extensive Arab trading. It also comes from a location that is much farther east than India. Its existence thus makes it highly unlikely that the zero was invented in Europe or Arabia and traveled east through Arab traders, as some had believed in the early 20th century. The Cambodian zero proved that zero was an Eastern invention.

This was posted 1 week ago. It has 1 note.

nevver:

Temperatures in the ’60s

This was posted 1 week ago. It has 853 notes.
un-monde-de-papier:

Colombus Avenue, rainy day, Childe Hassam, 1885.
Source: www.wikiart.org

un-monde-de-papier:

Colombus Avenue, rainy day, Childe Hassam, 1885.

Source: www.wikiart.org

This was posted 1 week ago. It has 89 notes. .