jhrmn:

It got even better.

jhrmn:

It got even better.

31 notes

classic-art:

Butterflies
Odilon Redon

classic-art:

Butterflies

Odilon Redon

27 notes

d956:

Claudio Abbado 1933-2014

Wozzeck interlude - Alban Berg 

(via jordanconductor)

12 notes

artemisdreaming:




How much I desire!
Inside my little satchel,
the moon, and flowers.
.
~Matsuo Bashō

Artemis:  One of my favorites.  :)

artemisdreaming:

How much I desire!

Inside my little satchel,

the moon, and flowers.

.

~Matsuo Bashō

Artemis:  One of my favorites.  :)

118 notes

"Evidence shows that longer work hours make us less productive. The example of the Netherlands shows how shorter work time can be achieved without a reduction in productivity and in living standards. Longer work hours are also associated with poor health and higher mortality rates – we may be risking our lives by working longer."

Why Are We Still Working So Hard? (via azspot)

(via azspot)

109 notes

The short guide to Capital in the 21st Century

otpglobal:

Can you give me Piketty’s argument in four bullet points?

  • The ratio of wealth to income is rising in all developed countries.
  • Absent extraordinary interventions, we should expect that trend to continue.
  • If it continues, the future will look like the 19th century, where economic elites have predominantly inherited their wealth rather than working for it.
  • The best solution would be a globally coordinated effort to tax wealth.

3 notes

satanic-capitalist:

Google Doesn’t Want You To Google This

Published on Jan 28, 2014

"Last year, the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD)—a group of the world’s top economies—decided it was time to crack down on international tax shenanigans through meaningful reform. These legal loopholes allow major tech corporations to move money around on paper through a series of shell corporations in Ireland, Bermuda, and the Netherlands. The companies save big, and "best" of all, it’s currently legal! This widespread strategy of moving money around involves two specific tactics better known as the "Dutch Sandwich" and the "Double Irish." Starting February 3, the Task Force on the Digital Economy is set to convene at the OECD’s office in Paris to discuss the global corporate response to these potential plans to rein in questionable tax practices. Last week, the OECD published various corporate responses to its initial proposal—needless to say, companies don’t want to stop what they’re doing…".* How are tech giants like Google responding to this? The Young Turks host Cenk Uygur breaks it down.

(via knowledgeequalsblackpower)

110 notes

"When she was young she had learned to caress the phrases of Chopin with their sinuous and excessively long necks, so free, so flexible, so tactile, which begin by seeking out and exploring a place for themselves far outside and away from the direction in which they started, far beyond the point which one might have expected them to reach, and which frolic in their fantasy distance only to come back more deliberately — with a more premeditated return, with more precision, as though upon a crystal glass that resonates until you cry out — to strike you in the heart."

Marcel ProustSwann’s Way. Trans. Lydia Davis. New York: Penguin, 2002. p. 344.

Chopin’s phases are not unlike the extenuated phrase that Proust himself often utilizes.

(via emmadelosnardos)

(via theantidote)

49 notes

dynamicafrica:

#EarthDay DOCUMENTARY: “Taking Root - The Vision of Wangari Maathai” (film clip).

Taking Root tells the dramatic story of Kenyan Nobel Peace Prize Laureate Wangari Maathai whose simple act of planting trees grew into a nationwide movement to safeguard the environment, protect human rights, and defend democracy—a movement for which this charismatic woman became an iconic inspiration.

Born in Nyeri, Kenya, in 1940, Maathai went on to study at Mount St. Scholastica College in Atchison, Kansas where she obtained a degree in Biological Sciences in 1964. Maathai furthered her studies at the University of Pittsburgh where she graduated with a Master of Science degree in 1966,  obtained a Ph.D. in 1971 from the University of Nairobi, where she also taught veterinary anatomy. This qualification saw Maathai make her history as she became the first woman in East and Central Africa to earn a doctorate degree. At the University of Nairobi, Maathai became chair of the Department of Veterinary Anatomy and an associate professor in 1976 and 1977 respectively, once again becoming the first woman to occupy those positions in the region.

Wangari Maathai is best known as the founder of the Green Belt Movement, which she founded in 1977, the 2004 Nobel Peace Prize Laureate, and the author of the book ‘Unbowed’.

The Green Belt Movement is an environmental organization that empowers communities, particularly women, to conserve the environment and improve livelihoods.

187 notes

"[…] Why was the class of “concords” thus limited to just these three basic intervals- the fourth, fifth, and octave? The answer to this question involves what the Pythagoreans called the “tetraktys (or quaternary) of the decad”, the geometric or “figurate” representation of the number 10 as the sum of the first four integers (i.e. 1 2 3 4=10) […] The purely musical significance of this “tetraktys of the decad” resides in the fact that the string-length ratios for the fourth, fifth, octave, twelfth (but not the eleventh) and double octave involve only these first four integers (i.e. 4/3, 3/2, 2/1, 3/1, 4/1, but not 8/3). But the decad had significance for the Pythagoreans that went far beyond this musical application. According to a later Pythagorean, Theon of Smyrna, “The importance of the quaternary… is great in music because of the consonances are found in it. But it is not only for this reason that all Pythagoreans hold it in highest esteem: it is also because it seems to outline the entire nature of the universe. It is for this reason that the formula of their oath was: “I swear by the one who has bestowed the tetraktys to the coming generations, source of eternal nature, into our souls."

A History of “Consonance” and “Dissonance” (1988), James Tenney. pp. 12-13 (via imaginarydances)

(via leadingtone)

48 notes

cinemaoftheworld:

O Sangue (Blood, 1989) - dir. Pedro Costa | Portugal

(via clairedenis)

124 notes

Miss Oyu — dir. Kenji Mizoguchi

(Source: strangewood, via mizoguchi)

190 notes

neurosciencestuff:

Brain Anatomy Differences Between Deaf, Hearing Depend on First Language Learned
In the first known study of its kind, researchers have shown that the language we learn as children affects brain structure, as does hearing status. The findings are reported in The Journal of Neuroscience.
While research has shown that people who are deaf and hearing differ in brain anatomy, these studies have been limited to studies of individuals who are deaf and use American Sign Language (ASL) from birth. But 95 percent of the deaf population in America is born to hearing parents and use English or another spoken language as their first language, usually through lip-reading. Since both language and audition are housed in nearby locations in the brain, understanding which differences are attributed to hearing and which to language is critical in understanding the mechanisms by which experience shapes the brain.
“What we’ve learned to date about differences in brain anatomy in hearing and deaf populations hasn’t taken into account the diverse language experiences among people who are deaf,” says senior author Guinevere Eden, DPhil, director for the Center for the Study of Learning at Georgetown University Medical Center (GUMC).
Eden and her colleagues report on a new structural brain imaging study that shows, in addition to deafness, early language experience – English versus ASL – impacts brain structure. Half of the adult hearing and half of the deaf participants in the study had learned ASL as children from their deaf parents, while the other half had grown up using English with their hearing parents.
“We found that our deaf and hearing participants, irrespective of language experience, differed in the volume of brain white matter in their auditory cortex. But, we also found differences in left hemisphere language areas, and these differences were specific to those whose native language was ASL,” Eden explains.
The research team, which includes Daniel S. Koo, PhD, and Carol J. LaSasso, PhD, of Gallaudet University in Washington, say their findings should impact studies of brain differences in deaf and hearing people going forward.
“Prior research studies comparing brain structure in individuals who are deaf and hearing attempted to control for language experience by only focusing on those who grew up using sign language,” explains Olumide Olulade, PhD, the study’s lead author and post-doctoral fellow at GUMC. “However, restricting the investigation to a small minority of the deaf population means the results can’t be applied to all deaf people.”
(Image: iStockphoto)

neurosciencestuff:

Brain Anatomy Differences Between Deaf, Hearing Depend on First Language Learned

In the first known study of its kind, researchers have shown that the language we learn as children affects brain structure, as does hearing status. The findings are reported in The Journal of Neuroscience.

While research has shown that people who are deaf and hearing differ in brain anatomy, these studies have been limited to studies of individuals who are deaf and use American Sign Language (ASL) from birth. But 95 percent of the deaf population in America is born to hearing parents and use English or another spoken language as their first language, usually through lip-reading. Since both language and audition are housed in nearby locations in the brain, understanding which differences are attributed to hearing and which to language is critical in understanding the mechanisms by which experience shapes the brain.

“What we’ve learned to date about differences in brain anatomy in hearing and deaf populations hasn’t taken into account the diverse language experiences among people who are deaf,” says senior author Guinevere Eden, DPhil, director for the Center for the Study of Learning at Georgetown University Medical Center (GUMC).

Eden and her colleagues report on a new structural brain imaging study that shows, in addition to deafness, early language experience – English versus ASL – impacts brain structure. Half of the adult hearing and half of the deaf participants in the study had learned ASL as children from their deaf parents, while the other half had grown up using English with their hearing parents.

“We found that our deaf and hearing participants, irrespective of language experience, differed in the volume of brain white matter in their auditory cortex. But, we also found differences in left hemisphere language areas, and these differences were specific to those whose native language was ASL,” Eden explains.

The research team, which includes Daniel S. Koo, PhD, and Carol J. LaSasso, PhD, of Gallaudet University in Washington, say their findings should impact studies of brain differences in deaf and hearing people going forward.

“Prior research studies comparing brain structure in individuals who are deaf and hearing attempted to control for language experience by only focusing on those who grew up using sign language,” explains Olumide Olulade, PhD, the study’s lead author and post-doctoral fellow at GUMC. “However, restricting the investigation to a small minority of the deaf population means the results can’t be applied to all deaf people.”

(Image: iStockphoto)

132 notes

hyperallergic:

The Onion skewers George W. Bush suggesting Bush the Painter is haunted by a dead Iraqi child.

WATCH IT HERE

133 notes

598 Plays

dailyclassicalmusic:

Composer: Olivier Messiaen (1908 - 1992)

Work: Les ressuscités et la lumière de Vie [The resurrected and the light of life] from Livre du Saint-Sacrament (1984)

Peformer: Olivier Latry

66 notes